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RESEARCH PAPERS

Stable Single-Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Based on Doped Ceria Electrolytes and La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 as a New Cathode

[+] Author and Article Information
Salvador Piñol

 Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la UAB, Bellaterra E-08193, Barcelona, Spainsalva@icmab.es

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 3(4), 434-437 (Mar 01, 2006) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2349525 History: Received November 30, 2005; Revised March 01, 2006

Several cathodes working in hydrocarbons diluted atmospheres have been proposed for single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fabrication. But, few cathodes work well in propane. In this work, we propose a new stable cathode of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (LSCO) for the single-chamber SOFCs, which works well in diluted propane atmospheres. For this purpose, powders of Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (CGO) for electrolytes and powders of (LSCO) for cathodes were prepared by sol-gel related techniques as pentadionate methods. These methods consist of preparing a solution from the acetates or pentadionates followed by a jellification. Then, the decomposition of the organic molecules is initiated, obtaining nanometric powders of the abovementioned compounds. In this way, we have obtained high purity powders of CGO and LSCO as confirmed by x-ray diffraction powder analysis. Microstructure was analyzed by SEM and TEM microscopy, the analysis of the powders obtained by sol-gel techniques shows a nanometric size grain (30nm) and reactivity for sintering was studied in detail. Very high-density electrolytes (9599% of theoretical density) were obtained with better power density currents than in samples prepared by solid-state reaction samples. Uniaxial pressing ceria based electrolytes were prepared from these powders and characterized in one chamber reactor using propane as fuel and LSCO+CGO as cathode. Anodes were prepared from Ni+CGO mixtures. Different gas mixtures of propane and air were prepared and tested at different flow rates in order to optimize electrical properties. Stable single-chamber fuel cells working in diluted propane atmospheres could be prepared with these materials.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical temperatures profile recorded for the furnace and for a CGO fuel cell. The feed gas composition was 30ml∕min for propane and 260ml∕min for synthetic air.

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Figure 2

O.C.V. (open circuit voltage) and current at V∼0 versus time for a fuel cell of CGO with LSCO as cathode recorded at 625°C in a feed gas composition of 30ml∕min for propane and 260ml∕min for synthetic air

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Figure 3

Cell voltage and power density as a function of current for a fuel cell of CGO supported-electrolyte with 10mm2 of painted Ni−CGO and LSCO-CGO electrodes measured at 625°C in a feed gas composition of 30ml∕min for propane and 260ml∕min for synthetic air

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Figure 4

The cell voltage versus propane feed rates for a single cell of CGO at 625°C operating in 260ml∕min of synthetic air

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Figure 5

The cell current versus propane feed rates for a single cell of CGO at 625°C operating in 260ml∕min of synthetic air

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