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First China-Japan Workshop on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

Development of Microtubular SOFCs

[+] Author and Article Information
Toshio Suzuki

Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560, Japantoshio.suzuki@aist.go.jp

Yoshihiro Funahashi, Toshiaki Yamaguchi, Yoshinobu Fujishiro, Masanobu Awano

Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560, Japan

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 5(3), 031201 (May 23, 2008) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2928633 History: Received June 22, 2007; Revised November 29, 2007; Published May 23, 2008

Microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have successfully demonstrated their advantages over conventional (planar) SOFCs, such as high thermal stability during rapid heat cycling and large electrode area per volume, which enables one to realize SOFC systems applicable to portable devices and auxiliary power units for automobile. In this study, the fabrication method of the microtubular SOFCs was examined. Shrinkage behavior and the microstructure of electrolyte/anode as a function of sintering temperature were shown and correlated with densification of the electrolyte during cosintering process.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Concept of microtubular SOFC bundle

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Figure 2

Fabrication process of microtubular SOFCs. Images of (1)–(4) are shown in Fig. 3.

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Figure 3

Image of microtubular SOFCs; (1) green, (2) green with electrolyte coating, (3) after cosintering, and (4) complete cell, 2mm diameter

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Figure 4

Shrinkage behavior (the axial direction) of anode (NiO-GDC) tube and GDC as a function of temperature

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Figure 5

Microstructure of the electrolyte surface on the anode supported tube for various sintering temperatures: (a) 1100°C, (b) 1200°C, (c) 1300°C, and (d) 1400°C

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Figure 6

Pore diameter distribution of the anode tubes for various sintering temperature; (a)–(d) correspond to Fig. 5

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Figure 7

Porosity of the anode tubes as a function of sintering temperature

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Figure 8

Performance of single microtubular SOFC

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