0
China-Japan Workshop on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

The Development of Thermally Stable Sealing Glass in the BaOB2O3SiO2 System for Planar SOFC Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Lian Peng

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, and Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100190, P.R.C.

Qingshan Zhu1

State Key Lab of Multiphase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100190, P.R.C.qszhu@home.ipe.ac.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 5(3), 031210 (May 27, 2008) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2930768 History: Received August 14, 2007; Revised January 09, 2008; Published May 27, 2008

The purpose of the present paper is to study the influence of glass composition on the thermal stability in the SiO2B2O3BaO system, and three glasses were consequently investigated. Although Glass A has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that shows the best match with those of anode and electrolyte materials of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), the thermal stability of Glass A is quite poor, where after being heat treated at 800°C for only 8h, the CTE of the glass increased more than 24%. The change of the CTE value was mainly attributed to the fast crystallization that formed high CTE value phases such as BaB2O4 and Ba2Si3O8. In order to improve the thermal stability, BaO in Glass A was replaced by B2O3 (Glass B) and SiO2 (Glass C). It was found that the decrease in the BaO content improved the thermal stability of the resultant glasses. Glass B showed less than 8% change of the CTE during annealing time at 800°C, while Glass C exhibited superior long-term thermal stability, where the change of the CTE was within the equipment detection limit after being heat treated for 300h at 800°C. The good thermal stability of Glass C was believed to be due to the formation of a more compact glass network after the substitution as compared with that of Glass A. The good thermal stability makes Glass C attractive to be used as the sealing material for SOFC applications.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Thermal expansion behaviors of Glass A together with those of 8YSZ and NiO-8YSZ (heating rate of 10°Cmin−1 in air)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Variation of CTE values (RT–500°C) with annealing time at 800°C for Glass A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

XRD results of Glass A annealed at 800°C for various times

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

SEM micrograph of the Glass A surface after being annealed at 800°C for 8h; (a) a low magnification and (b) a high magnification of marked area in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Thermal expansion behaviors of Glasses A–C together with those of 8YSZ and NiO-8YSZ (heating rate of 10°Cmin−1 in air)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Variation of CTE values (RT–500°C) with annealing time at 800°C for Glasses A–C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

XRD patterns of Glass B after being annealed at 800°C for various times

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

A SEM micrograph of the Glass B surface after being annealed at 800°C for 20h.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

XRD patterns of Glass C after being annealed at 800°C for various times

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

A SEM micrograph of the Glass C surface after being annealed at 800°C for 300h

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In