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Technical Briefs

On-Demand Hydrogen via High-Pressure Water Reforming for Military Fuel Cell Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Benjamin G. Oster

Energy & Environmental Research Center, University of North Dakota, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018boster@undeerc.org

Ronald C. Timpe

Energy & Environmental Research Center, University of North Dakota, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018rtimpe@undeerc.org

Ted R. Aulich

Energy & Environmental Research Center, University of North Dakota, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018taulich@undeerc.org

Mike C. Lin

U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Construction Engineering, Research Laboratory (ERDC CERL), 2902 Newmark Drive, Champaign, IL 61822m-lin@cecer.army.mil

Franklin H. Holcomb

U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Construction Engineering, Research Laboratory (ERDC CERL), 2902 Newmark Drive, Champaign, IL 61822franklin.h.holcomb@erdc.usace.army.mil

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 5(4), 044501 (Sep 09, 2008) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2931460 History: Received November 06, 2006; Revised January 31, 2008; Published September 09, 2008

Researchers have developed a high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR) process that produces high-pressure hydrogen from a jet fuel feedstock. Converting petroleum-based fuels to hydrogen for fuel cell use is a unique approach to reducing military petroleum consumption by improving petroleum utilization efficiency. HPWR is an attractive option because, unlike traditional steam methane reforming, it does not require postreformer hydrogen compression and storage. A HPWR apparatus was designed and manufactured. Several catalysts were tested for their ability to produce high-pressure hydrogen from jet fuel. S-8, which is a jet fuel derived from natural gas, was used as a model feedstock for initial experiments because the fuel is sulfur and aromatics free. After optimizing with S-8, JP-8 will be utilized for future experiments. The most promising catalyst produced a 4000psi(gauge) product gas stream that contained 54mol% hydrogen. These experimental results show that HPWR is a promising solution for high-pressure hydrogen production as a key step toward reducing military petroleum use.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

HPWR process optimization system

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Figure 2

Complete view of HPWR process optimization system

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Figure 3

Simplified schematic of the high-pressure reforming system

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Figure 4

Product gas hydrogen concentration versus conversion for a high-pressure jet fuel-reforming system

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Figure 5

Product gas methane concentration versus conversion for a high-pressure jet fuel-reforming system

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