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Research Papers

Dynamic Analysis of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Models With Different Assumptions of Temperature Layers

[+] Author and Article Information
Handa Xi

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Jing Sun1

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 6(1), 011011 (Nov 06, 2008) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2971055 History: Received May 03, 2007; Revised November 26, 2007; Published November 06, 2008

As solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is rapidly evolving, high-fidelity mathematical models based on physical principles have become essential tools for SOFC system design and analysis. While several SOFC models have been developed by different groups using different modeling assumptions, little analysis of the effects of these assumptions on model performance can be found in literature. Meanwhile, to support system optimization and control design activities, a trade-off often has to be made between high fidelity and low complexity. This trade-off can be influenced by the number of temperature layers assumed in the energy balance to represent the SOFC structure. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the temperature layer assumption on the performance of the dynamic planar SOFC model. Four models of co-flow planar SOFCs are derived using the finite volume discretization approach along with different assumptions in the number of temperature layers. The model with four temperature layers is used as the baseline model, and the other models aimed at reducing the complexity of the baseline model are developed and compared through simulations as well as linear analysis. We show that the model with as few as two temperature layers—the solid structure and air bulk flow—is able to capture the dynamics of SOFCs, while assuming only one temperature layer results in significantly large modeling error.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Co-flow planar SOFCs (dimensions of the layers are not to scale)

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Figure 2

Finite volume discretization for co-flow planar SOFCs

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Figure 3

Open-loop temperature response at different locations in the SOFC using the baseline 4T model

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Figure 4

Planar SOFC and CPOX system

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Figure 5

Steady-state spatial distributions of (a) current density, (b) PEN temperature, and (c) temperature gradient

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Figure 6

Comparison of open-loop response with model assumptions in Table 3

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Figure 7

Bode plots of linearized models at part load operation condition

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Figure 8

Bode plots of linearized models at full load operation condition

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Figure 9

Dynamic response of TPEN16 to a 5% step increase of NairS,in at the full load operation setpoint

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Figure 10

Steady-state response of stack voltage to small perturbation in NairC,in around part load operation condition

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Figure 11

Dynamic response of stack voltage to small perturbation in NairC,in around part load operation condition

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Figure 12

Effects of heat transfer rates between air flow and solid structure on open-loop response to load increase

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Figure 13

Effects of heat transfer rates between fuel flow and solid structure on open-loop response to load increase

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Figure 14

Comparison of open-loop response with model assumptions in Table 3. Fuel utilization ratio=50%.

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Figure 15

Steady-state spatial distributions of (a) current density, (b) PEN temperature, and (c) temperature gradient. Operating setpoints given in Table 6 are used for simulations

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Figure 16

Open-loop response with model assumptions in Table 3. Operating setpoints given in Table 6 are used for simulations.

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