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Research Papers

Hybrid Simulation Facility Based on Commercial 100 kWe Micro Gas Turbine

[+] Author and Article Information
Mario L. Ferrari

Thermochemical Power Group (TPG), Dipartimento di Macchine, Sistemi Energetici e Trasporti (DiMSET), Università di Genova, via Montallegro 1, Genova 16145, Italymario.ferrari@unige.it

Matteo Pascenti

Thermochemical Power Group (TPG), Dipartimento di Macchine, Sistemi Energetici e Trasporti (DiMSET), Università di Genova, via Montallegro 1, Genova 16145, Italymatteo.pascenti@unige.it

Roberto Bertone

Thermochemical Power Group (TPG), Dipartimento di Macchine, Sistemi Energetici e Trasporti (DiMSET), Università di Genova, via Montallegro 1, Genova 16145, Italyroberto.bertone@unige.it

Loredana Magistri

Thermochemical Power Group (TPG), Dipartimento di Macchine, Sistemi Energetici e Trasporti (DiMSET), Università di Genova, via Montallegro 1, Genova 16145, Italyloredana.magistri@unige.it

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 6(3), 031008 (May 13, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3006200 History: Received June 17, 2007; Revised November 30, 2007; Published May 13, 2009

A new high temperature fuel cell-micro gas turbine physical emulator has been designed and installed in the framework of the European Integrated Project “FELICITAS” at the Thermochemical Power Group (TPG) laboratory located at Savona. The test rig is based on a commercial 100 kWe recuperated micro gas turbine (mGT) (Turbec T100) modified to be connected to a modular volume designed for physical emulation of fuel cell stack influence. The test rig has been developed starting with a complete theoretical analysis of the micro gas turbine design and off-design performance and with the definition of the more flexible layout to be used for different hybrid system (molten carbonate fuel cell or solid oxide fuel cell) emulation. The layout of the system (connecting pipes, valves, and instrumentation, in particular mass flow meter locations) has been carefully designed, and is presented in detail in this paper. Particular attention has been focused on the viscous pressure loss minimization: (i) to reduce the unbalance between compressor and expander, (ii) to maintain a high measurement precision, and (iii) to have an effective plant flexibility. Moreover, the volume used to emulate the cell stack has been designed to be strongly modular (different from a similar system developed by U.S. Department Of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory) to allow different volume size influence on the mGT rig to be easily tested. The modular high temperature volume has been designed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) commercial tool (FLUENT ). The CFD analysis was used (i) to reach a high level of uniformity in the flow distribution inside the volume, (ii) to have a velocity field (m/s) similar to the one existing inside the emulated cell stack, and (iii) to minimize (as possible) the pressure losses. The volume insulation will also allow to consider a strong thermal capacity effect during the tests. This paper reports the experimental results of several tests carried out on the rig (using the mGT at electrical stand-alone conditions with the machine control system operating at constant rotational speed) at different load values and at both steady-state and transient conditions.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

The modular volume (CFD development calculations)

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Figure 4

Final layout of the rig

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Figure 5

Picture of the modular volume (before insulation) connected with the machine

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Figure 9

Operative curves at constant Δp/pc: 4% of bleed

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Figure 10

Surge margin and power ratios versus pressure drop between the recuperator and the combustor

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Figure 1

The microturbine power module modifications for the volume coupling

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Figure 2

The connection pipes (CFD development calculations)

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Figure 6

Plant instrumentation

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Figure 7

Model results: microturbine characterization (compressor map)

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Figure 8

Operative curves at constant Δp/pc: bleed closed

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Figure 11

The connecting pipes during building activities (the direct line)

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Figure 12

Experimental data on compressor map (direct line configuration)

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Figure 13

The test rig: volume zero configuration

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Figure 14

Load rejection: rotational speed and main fuel valve fractional opening (volume zero configuration)

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Figure 15

Load rejection: Recuperator mass flow rate and turbine outlet temperature (volume zero configuration)

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Figure 16

Shutdown phase on compressor map for two different conditions: (i) volume zero, and (ii) modular volume

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Figure 17

Pressure losses between the recuperator and the combustor for three different conditions: (i) direct line, (ii) volume zero, and (iii) modular volume

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Figure 18

Temperature losses between the recuperator and the combustor for three different conditions: (i) direct line, (ii) volume zero, and (iii) modular volume

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