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Research Papers

Oxidation Behavior of Various Metallic Alloys for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect

[+] Author and Article Information
Chun-Lin Chu1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-li 32001, Taiwanjenlen.boy@msa.hinet.net

Jian-Yih Wang

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwanjy-wang@yahoo.com.tw

Ruey-Yi Lee

Institute of Nuclear Energy Research Atomic Energy Council, Executive Yuan, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwanrylee@iner.gov.tw

Tien-Hsi Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-li 32001, Taiwanbenlee@cc.ncu.edu.tw

Shyong Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-li 32001, Taiwanshyong@cc.ncu.edu.tw

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 6(3), 031013 (May 14, 2009) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3007430 History: Received June 22, 2007; Revised February 28, 2008; Published May 14, 2009

Ten iron-based alloys and nickel-based alloys were subjected to oxidation treatment in a hot air environment for various periods. In this investigation, all alloys contained a certain amount of Cr, and Cr2O3 and (Mn,Fe,Cr)3O4 spinel compounds are generated on the surface oxides. Other spinels that contain Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni are also formed on it; the compositions depend on the composition of the steels and any other materials that are in contact with the interconnects. Accordingly, the role of spinels in the oxidation of interconnects must be understood.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Micrographs of surfaces of (a) Haynes230, (b) Inconel718, (c) Superplastic Inconel718, (d) Ni–19Si–3Nb–0.15B–0.1C (vacuum), and (e) Ni–19Si–3Nb–0.15B–0.1C (air) as oxidized at 800C for 200h

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Figure 7

Thermal expansion of iron-based alloys

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Figure 8

Thermal expansion of nickel-based alloys

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Figure 9

Electrical resistance versus oxidation period up to 200h

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Figure 10

Weight gain as a function oxidation time for five alloys at 800°C for 200h in hot air

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Figure 6

XRD patterns of oxidized alloys: (a) Haynes230, (b) Inconel718, (c) Superplastic Inconel718, (d) Ni–19Si–3Nb–0.15B–0.1C (vacuum), and (e) Ni–19Si–3Nb–0.15B–0.1C (air)

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Figure 5

X-ray diffraction patterns of oxidized surface as processed at 800°C for 200h: (a) Crofere22 APU, (b) Equivalent ZMG232, (c) SS430, (d) SS304, and (e) ZMG232

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Figure 4

Micrographs of oxide scale/alloy interface of (a) Crofer22 APU, (b) equivalent ZMG232, (c) SS304, (d) Haynes230, (e) Inconel718, and (f) SS430. Corresponding EPMA indicates that compounds are Cr, O, Fe, and Mn.

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Figure 2

Surface morphology of iron-based alloy oxidized at 800°C in air for 200h: (a) Crofer22 APU, (b) ZMG232, (c) equivalent ZMG232, (d) SS430, and (e) SS304

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Figure 1

Apparatus for measuring electrical resistance

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