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Research Papers

Bifunctionally Graded Electrode Supported SOFC Modeling and Computational Thermal Fluid Analysis for Experimental Design

[+] Author and Article Information
Junxiang Shi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208

Xingjian Xue1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208xue@cec.sc.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 8(1), 011005 (Nov 01, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002141 History: Received October 09, 2009; Revised April 15, 2010; Published November 01, 2010; Online November 01, 2010

A comprehensive 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed for a bi-electrode supported cell (BSC) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The model includes complicated transport phenomena of mass/heat transfer, charge (electron and ion) migration, and electrochemical reactions. The uniqueness of the modeling study is that functionally graded porous electrode property is taken into account, including not only linear but also nonlinear porosity distributions. The model is validated using experimental data from open literature. Numerical results indicate that BSC performance is strongly dependent on both operating conditions and porous microstructure distributions of electrodes. Using the proposed fuel/gas feeding design, the uniform hydrogen distribution within the porous anode is achieved; the oxygen distribution within the cathode is dependent on porous microstructure distributions as well as pressure loss conditions. Simulation results also show that fairly uniform temperature distribution can be obtained with the proposed fuel/gas feeding design. This modeling work can provide a pre-experimental analysis and guide experimental designs for BSC test.

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Figures

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Figure 1

BSC with gas feeding design

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Figure 3

One-dimensional distributions of the heterogeneous porosities

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Figure 4

Cell performance with different cathode pressure losses

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Figure 6

Mass concentration at cathode/electrolyte interface under Δpc=375 Pa: (a) parabolic distribution, (b) linear distribution, and (c) inverse parabolic distribution

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Figure 8

Variation in current densities with pressure loss under different inlet temperatures: (a) T=850 K, (b) T=900 K, and (c) T=950 K

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Figure 9

Temperature field at cathode/electrolyte interface under different inlet temperature conditions: (a) inlet temperature of 850 K, (b) inlet temperature of 900 K, and (c) inlet temperature of 950 K

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Figure 10

Cell performance under different cathode pressure loss: (a) inlet temperature T=850 K, (b) inlet temperature T=900 K, and (c) inlet temperature T=950 K

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Figure 2

Comparison between numerical results and experimental data

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Figure 5

Mass concentration at cathode/electrolyte interface under Δpc=1500 Pa: (a) parabolic distribution, (b) linear distribution, and (c) inverse parabolic distribution

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Figure 7

Mass concentration at cathode/electrolyte interface under Δpc=150 Pa: (a) parabolic distribution, (b) linear distribution, and (c) inverse parabolic distribution

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