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Technical Briefs

The Ejector Performance of a 75 kW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell System

[+] Author and Article Information
Beomjoo Kim

 Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), 65 Munji-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-380, Republic of Koreabjkim@kepri.re.kr

Do Hyung Kim, Junghyun Lee, Seung Won Kang, Hee Chun Lim

 Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), 65 Munji-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-380, Republic of Korea

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 8(1), 014503 (Nov 01, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002131 History: Received August 18, 2009; Revised April 14, 2010; Published November 01, 2010; Online November 01, 2010

An ejector is a machine for mixing and transporting fluid under vacuum. Ejectors enhance system efficiency, are easily operated, have a mechanically simple structure, and do not require a power supply. Because of these advantages, ejectors have been used in a variety of industrial fields such as refrigeration systems, power plants, and oil plants. In this work, an ejector was used to safely recycle anode tail gas in a 75 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system at Korea Electric Power Research Institute. In this system, the ejector was placed at the mixing point between the anode tail gas and either the cathode tail gas or fresh air. Because commercial ejectors are not designed for the operating conditions of our fuel cell system, a new ejector was designed for use beyond the operating limits of conventional ejectors. In this study, the entrainment ratio and anode outlet pressure were measured according to the ratio of the nozzle diameter to the throat diameter in the newly designed ejector. These results help to define important criteria of ejectors for MCFC recycling.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the 75 kW MCFC system

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Figure 2

Thermodynamic points from Aspen-Plus

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Figure 3

Temperature entrainment ratio curve

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Figure 4

Molecular weight entrainment ratio curve

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Figure 5

Schematic of the ejector

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Figure 6

Schematic of the ejector test apparatus

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Figure 7

(a) The ejector experiment apparatus; (b) the nozzle installed in the ejector

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Figure 8

Entrainment ratio and pressure ratio for ω=0.24

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Figure 9

Entrainment ratio and pressure ratio for ω=0.37

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Figure 10

Entrainment ratio and pressure ratio for ω=0.48

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Figure 11

Entrainment ratio and pressure ratio for ω=0.57

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Figure 13

Power, entrainment ratio, and pressure ratio

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Figure 14

Pressure distribution and entrainment ratio in the ejector

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