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Research Papers

Power Generation Properties of Microtubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Bundle Under Pressurized Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Hashimoto1

 Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan

Y. Liu2

 Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan

K. Asano, F. Yoshiba, M. Mori

 Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan

Y. Funahashi

Fine Ceramics Research Association (FCRA), AIST, Shimo-shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8561, Japan

Y. Fujishiro

 Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Shimo-shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8561, Japan

1

Corresponding author. Present affiliation: Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Japan.

2

Present affiliation: Energy Materials Research Center, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, China.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 8(2), 021010 (Nov 30, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002314 History: Received October 02, 2009; Revised June 24, 2010; Published November 30, 2010; Online November 30, 2010

A microtubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) bundle was developed based on a new design. Anode-supported microtubular SOFCs with the cell configuration, La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF)-Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) cathode/CGO electrolyte/Ni-CGO anode were fabricated and bundled in a porous LSCF current-collecting cube with sides of 1 cm. The power generation of the fabricated SOFC bundle was measured under pressurized conditions. Using humidified 30% H2/N2 mixture gas and air, the cubic power density of the bundle at 500°C under atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) was 0.47Wcm3 at 0.4Acm2. With increasing operating pressure, the performance increased, and the cubic power density reached 0.66Wcm3 at 0.6 MPa. The power enhancement brought about by pressurization was due to increased open circuit voltage and reduced polarization resistance. After comparing the power gain of the pressurized SOFC and the power consumption gain of the air compressor used for pressurization, it was found that pressurized cell operation exhibited the highest actual power gain at around 0.3 MPa.

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Figures

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Figure 1

The assembled microtubular SOFC bundle: (a) appearance and (b) the cross section diagram of LSCF cathode cube

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Figure 2

Setup of the microtubular SOFC bundle in the pressurized heating chamber of the evaluation system

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Figure 3

OCV of the microtubular SOFC bundle as a function of pressure at 500°C

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Figure 4

Power generation curves of the microtubular SOFC bundle under pressurized conditions (500°C)

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Figure 5

Temperature changes of the microtubular SOFC bundle as a function of current density

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Figure 6

Polarization curves of the microtubular SOFC bundle at (a) atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and (b) 0.6 MPa

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Figure 7

ASRs of the microtubular SOFC bundle as a function of cell pressure

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Figure 8

Cell conductance of the microtubular SOFC bundle at OCV as a function of cell pressure

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Figure 9

Conceptual diagram for noncombined cycle pressurized SOFC system

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Figure 10

SOFC power and power consumption by a compressor Wat P2 as a function of operation pressures

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Figure 11

Comparison between SOFC power gain and compressor power consumption gain as a function of cell pressure

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