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Research Papers

Stainless Steel/Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Composite Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

[+] Author and Article Information
Sebastian Molin1

Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics,  Gdansk University of Technology, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Polandsebastian@sofc.pl

Mateusz Tolczyk, Piotr Jasinski

Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics,  Gdansk University of Technology, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland

Maria Gazda

Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics,  Gdansk University of Technology, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 8(5), 051019 (Jul 05, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003994 History: Received January 28, 2011; Revised April 01, 2011; Published July 05, 2011; Online July 05, 2011

In this paper composite supports for solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated and evaluated. Substrates were composed of stainless steel and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders mixed in different volume ratios. Their sintering behavior (linear shrinkage, resulting porosity) and high temperature properties (oxidation resistance, electrical conductivity) were evaluated. Based on those results the best composition for composite supports was selected and fuel cells were fabricated. Thin YSZ electrolytes were deposited on one side of the support and sintered at 1350 °C in pure hydrogen, while LNF (LaNi0.6 Fe0.4 O3 ) cathodes were deposited on the top of the electrolyte and fired in situ at 800 °C. The fuel cells provided power density of about 80 mWcm-2 at 800 °C. It is worth noting that this performance was achieved without adding any catalytically active phases into composite support, while at the same time the supports exhibited relatively low porosity. This demonstrates that stainless steel can serve as an anode active material. Degradation of this fuel cell was fast (12%/h), nonetheless its performance seems interesting for further investigation.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Linear shrinkage of composite samples after sintering at 1350 °C for 4 h

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Figure 3

Electrical conductivity of composite samples after sintering at 1350 °C for 4 h, values measured at 800 °C in dry hydrogen

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Figure 4

Mass change of selected samples subjected to cyclic oxidation at 800 °C

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Figure 5

Diameter change of selected samples subjected to cyclic oxidation at 800 °C

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Figure 6

Total porosity change of selected samples subjected to cyclic oxidation at 800 °C

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Figure 7

X-ray diffractograms of different samples before and after oxidation at 800 °C

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Figure 8

Current-voltage characteristics of prepared cells at 800 °C/700 °C/600 °C

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Figure 9

Cell current measured at 0.5 V at 800 °C

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Figure 10

Nyquist plots of cell measured at at 800 °C at OCV before and after aging

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Figure 11

SEM cross section of the measured cell

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Figure 2

Total porosity of composite samples after sintering at 1350 °C for 4 h

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