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Research Papers

Compositional Effect of Thin Electrode Functional Layers on the Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

[+] Author and Article Information
Hyeon-Cheol Park

 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65401

Fatih Dogan1

 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65401doganf@mst.edu

1

Corresponding Author. Present address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1,400 N Bishop Ave., 222 McNutt Hall, Rolla, MO 65409.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 8(6), 061002 (Sep 23, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004470 History: Received February 13, 2011; Revised May 30, 2011; Published September 23, 2011; Online September 23, 2011

Anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) were fabricated by addition of various metal oxides such as Fe2 O3 , Co3 O4 and TiO2 to thin anode functional layers between the electrolyte (yttria-stabilized zirconia, YSZ) and electrode materials (anode support: YSZ-NiO). Effect of the additives on the power density and impedance spectra of SOFC was studied. It was found that addition of Co3 O4 to anode functional layer was most effective towards improvement of power densities and reduction of the total ohmic resistance as well as the area specific resistance of the cells, while addition of TiO2 to anode functional layer resulted in lower power densities. Possible mechanisms on the relationship between the additives in electrode functional layers and the cell performance were briefly discussed.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Impedance spectra depending on the gas flow rate (at 750 °C): (a) Top of the figure - air flow rate was changed (○ - air flow rate: 0 ml/min., □ - air flow rate: 600 ml/min., ▽ - air flow rate: 1070 ml/min.) and hydrogen flow rate was 300 ml/min. (b) Bottom of the figure - hydrogen flow rate was changed (○ - H2 flow rate: 80 ml/min., □ - H2 flow rate: 330 ml/min., ▽ - H2 flow rate: 1580 ml/min.), and the low frequency at peak of the curve was ∼10 Hz and the high frequency was ∼1.5 kHz).

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Figure 2

Impedance spectra (at 750 °C): (□: cell with cathode functional layer, ○: cell without cathode functional layer, and the frequency at peak of the curve: ∼ 40 Hz)

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Figure 3

Comparison of cell performance (at 850 °C): (□: cell with cathode functional layer, ○: cell without cathode functional layer)

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Figure 4

Microstructural development of a typical cell (From bottom; anode support: 0.9 mm, and anode functional layer: 25 μm, electrolyte: 16 μm, cathode functional layer: 25 μm, cathode layer: 30 μm)

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Figure 5

Voltage, power density and current density plots for the cells having different composition of the anode functional layer: (a) standard cell (b) Co3 O4 10 wt.% added (c) TiO2 10 wt.% added (d) Fe2 O3 10 wt.% added. (□: 850 °C, ○: 800 °C, ▽: 750 °C)

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Figure 7

SEM micrographs of the tested cells: (a) standard cell (b) Co3 O4 10 wt.% added (c) TiO2 10 wt.% added (d) Fe2 O3 10 wt.% added

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Figure 8

Voltage, power density and current density plots for the Co3 O4 added cell (750 °C ∼ 850 °C). (□: 850 °C, ○: 800 °C, ▽: 750 °C)

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Figure 9

Impedance spectra for the Co3 O4 added cell (750 °C ∼850 °C). (□: 850 °C, ○: 800 °C, ▽: 750 °C, and the low frequency: ∼8 Hz, and high frequency: 1.5 kHz)

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Figure 6

Impedance spectra for the cells having different composition of the anode functional layer: (a) standard cell (b) Co3 O4 10 wt.% added (c) TiO2 10 wt.% added (d) Fe2 O3 10 wt.% added. (□: 850 °C, ○: 800 °C, ▽: 750 °C)

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