0
Research Papers

Parametric Investigations of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrodes Manufactured by Spraying

[+] Author and Article Information
Babar M. Koraishy

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78703Koraishy@mail.utexas.edu

Sam Solomon

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78703samsolomon18@hotmail.com

Jeremy P. Meyers

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78703Meyers@me.utexas.edu

Kristin L. Wood

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78703wood@mail.utexas.edu

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 9(2), 021003 (Mar 19, 2012) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005415 History: Received August 18, 2011; Revised October 13, 2011; Published March 07, 2012; Online March 19, 2012

Key processing steps in the thin-film process of manufacturing catalyst layers for direct methanol fuel cells are catalyst ink formulation and its application. The catalyst ink is typically composed of supported or unsupported catalysts, binder (ionomer), solvents, and additives. Rheological properties of the ink, amount of binder, and choice of solvents are tuned to match the particular ink application process used to fabricate the electrode, as each coating process has its own unique requirements. Besides affecting the coating process, the choice and ratios of these components can significantly affect the electrochemical performance of the electrode. In this study, catalyst inks are designed and investigated for the spraying process, for utilization in the continuous fabrication of DMFC electrodes. For this purpose, the effect of the binder (ionomer) content on the performance of the electrodes is studied in detail. Decal-transfer electrodes are fabricated on a custom-built automated spraying apparatus with individually specified anode and cathode binder contents, and assembled to form a catalyst coated membrane (CCM) type membrane electrode assembly (MEA). These electrodes are rigorously tested to specifically identify their electrochemical performance, catalyst utilization and electrode morphology.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Cross section of a typical MEA

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Two-axis spraying machine

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Effect of Nafion content on cell performance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Power at different Nafion content

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Pt:Ru black anode at 50,000 X

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Pt-black cathode at 50,000 X

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of anode Nafion content on MEA performance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Power at different anode Nafion content

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effect of cathode Nafion content on MEA performance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Power at different cathode Nafion content

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In