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Research Papers

Evaluation of Methods for Thermal Management in a Coal-Based SOFC Turbine Hybrid Through Numerical Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
David Tucker, Eric Liese, Larry Lawson, Stephen Zitney, Randall Gemmen

U.S. Department of Energy,  National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880

John VanOsdol1

U.S. Department of Energy,  National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880jvanos@netl.doe.gov

J. Christopher Ford, Comas Haynes

 Georgia Institute of Technology, Center for Fuel Cell and Battery Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405

1

Corresponding author.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 9(4), 041004 (Jun 15, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006044 History: Received August 29, 2008; Revised January 26, 2012; Published June 15, 2012; Online June 15, 2012

Managing the temperatures and heat transfer in the fuel cell of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) gas turbine (GT) hybrid fired on coal syngas presents certain challenges over a natural gas based system, in that the latter can take advantage of internal reforming to offset heat generated in the fuel cell. Three coal based SOFC/GT configuration designs for thermal management in the main power block are evaluated using steady state numerical simulations developed in ASPEN PLUS. A comparison is made on the basis of efficiency, operability issues and component integration. To focus on the effects of different power block configurations, the analysis assumes a consistent syngas composition in each case, and does not explicitly include gasification or syngas cleanup. A fuel cell module rated at 240 MW was used as a common basis for three different methods. Advantages and difficulties for each configuration are identified in the simulations.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Outline of five cases studied

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Figure 2

Fuel cell power increase as a function of pressure ratio

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Figure 3

The effect of pressure on fuel cell losses and Nernst potential with a fuel utilization of 80%

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Figure 4

The effect of pressure on fuel cell efficiency and Nernst potential when the fuel cell is operated at 500 mA/cm2 with a fuel utilization of 80%

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Figure 5

A simple GT cycle for 1200 K and 1500 K turbine inlet temperature

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Figure 6

Simplified flow diagram and results of a cycle using the heat of compression to preheat cathode air

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Figure 7

The effect of oxygen concentration on fuel utilization in the fuel cell (for set cell potential of 0.7 V)

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Figure 8

Simplified flow diagram of a cycle using blower driven cathode recycle to preheat cathode air

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Figure 9

Simplified flow diagram of a cycle using ejector driven cathode recycle to preheat cathode air

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Figure 10

Simplified flow diagram of a cycle using turbine exhaust gas recuperation to preheat cathode air

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Figure 11

Simplified flow diagram of a cycle using turbine exhaust gas recuperation to preheat cathode air

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