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Research Papers

Electrochemical Characterization of a High-Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Using Doped-Poly Benzimidazole as Solid Polymer Electrolyte

[+] Author and Article Information
S. A. Grigoriev

National Research University
“Moscow Power Engineering Institute”,
Krasnokazarmennaya Street, 14,
Moscow 111250, Russia
e-mail: sergey.grigoriev@outlook.com

N. V. Kuleshov

National Research University
“Moscow Power Engineering Institute”,
Krasnokazarmennaya Street, 14,
Moscow 111250, Russia

A. S. Grigoriev

National Research Center
“Kurchatov Institute”,
Kurchatov Square, 1,
Moscow 123182, Russia

P. Millet

Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux,
UMR CNRS No. 8182,
Université Paris Sud 11,
bât 410,
Orsay Cedex 91405, France

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 7, 2013; final manuscript received December 19, 2014; published online March 3, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Abel Hernandez-Guerrero.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 12(3), 031004 (Jun 01, 2015) (4 pages) Paper No: FC-13-1045; doi: 10.1115/1.4029873 History: Received May 07, 2013; Revised December 19, 2014; Online March 03, 2015

A high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell using H3PO4-doped poly benzimidazole (PBI) as solid polymer electrolyte has been developed and tested. The influences of operating temperature (between 130 and 170 °C), operating pressure (between 0 and 2 bar), and air flow rate on the performances of the fuel cell have been measured. A maximum power density of ca. 200 mW/cm2 has been measured. The existence of an optimum air flow rate (expressed in oxygen stoichiometric ratio) has been put into evidence. It allows an increase of the fuel cell voltage from 250 mV up to ca. 400 mV at 0.4 A/cm2.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Chemical structure of PBI chain used in this study

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the high-temperature fuel cell. 1: titanium cell holder; 2: fittings for reactant/product supply/removal; 3: fittings for heating/cooling; 4: sealants; 5: graphite-based flow field plates; 6: PBI membrane; 7: gas diffusion electrodes with electrocatalytic layers.

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Fig. 3

Dependence of current–voltage curve upon the cell temperature at H2–O2 operation mode after 300 hr of cell operation. Stoichiometric ratio: hydrogen 1.5 and oxygen 2.5. Atmospheric pressure of gases.

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Fig. 4

Dependence of current voltage curve upon the reactant's pressure at H2–air operation mode after 300 hr of cell operation. Stoichiometric ratio: hydrogen 1.5 and oxygen 2.5. Temperature 160 °C.

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Fig. 5

Dependence of fuel cell voltage upon oxygen stoichiometric ratio at current density 0.4 A/cm2 and H2/air operation mode. Temperature 160 °C. Atmospheric pressure of gases. Stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen 1.5.

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