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Research Papers

Effect of Temperature Fluctuation on Creep and Failure Probability for Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

[+] Author and Article Information
Wenchun Jiang

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing,
College of Chemical Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (East China),
Qingdao 266580, China;
e-mail: jiangwenchun@126.com

Yun Luo, Weiya Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing,
College of Chemical Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (East China),
Qingdao 266580, China

Wanchuck Woo

Neutron Science Division,
Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute,
1045 Daedeok-daero,
Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353, South Korea

S. T. Tu

Key Laboratory of Pressure System and
Safety (MOE),
School of Mechanical and Power Engineering,
East China University of
Science and Technology,
Shanghai 200237, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 14, 2015; final manuscript received September 14, 2015; published online October 21, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Kevin Huang.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 12(5), 051004 (Oct 21, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: FC-15-1027; doi: 10.1115/1.4031697 History: Received May 14, 2015; Revised September 14, 2015

The creep and failure probability of a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) through a duty cycle is calculated by finite element method (FEM) and Weibull method, respectively. Two sealing methods, namely, rigid seal and bonded compliant seal (BCS), are compared. For the rigid seal, failure is predicted in the glass ceramic because of a failure probability of 1 and maximum creep strain. For the BCS design, the foil can absorb part of thermal stresses in the cell by its own elastoplastic deformation, which considerably decreases failure probability and creep strain in the SOFC. The creep strength of BCS method is achieved by sealing foil with excellent creep properties. Temperature fluctuation during the operating stage leads to the increase in thermal stress and failure probability. In particular, temperature change from low-power to high-power state results in a considerable increase in the creep strain, leading to creep failure for the rigid seal. A failure probability of 1 is generated during start-up and shut-down stages. Therefore, temperature fluctuation should be controlled to ensure structural integrity, and lowering the operating temperature can decrease failure probability and creep failure.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Finite element model of BCS planar SOFC

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Fig. 2

Finite element model of the rigid seal planar SOFC

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Fig. 3

Thermal history of fabrication (a) and duty cycle (b)

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Fig. 4

As-fabricated residual stress contour of SOFC (a), anode (b), electrolyte (c), cathode (d), glass–ceramic (e), and window frame (f) for the rigid seal

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Fig. 5

As-fabricated residual stress contour of SOFC (a), anode (b), electrolyte (c), cathode (d), Ag–CuO (e), BNi-2 (f), foil (g), and window frame (h) for BCS design

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Fig. 6

The maximum principal stress change with time during a duty cycle

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Fig. 9

A comparison of creep strain along cell thickness with and without interconnector

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Fig. 8

Creep strain contour of the rigid seal-800 °C (a), BCS-800 °C (b), rigid seal-600 °C (c), and BCS-600 °C (d)

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Fig. 7

The contour of the maximum principal creep strain for the rigid seal (a) and BCS (b) of SOFC

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