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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Numerical Analysis of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Steam Electrolysis Operation for Hydrogen Production

[+] Author and Article Information
Juhyun Kang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,
Guseong-Dong 373-1, Yuseong-Gu,
Daejeon 305701, South Korea
e-mail: juhyunkang@kaist.ac.kr

Joonguen Park

Fuel Cell Vehicle Team 1,
Hyundai Motor Company,
Mabuk-dong, Giheung-Gu,
Yongin 446-716, South Korea
e-mail: park1212@hyundai.com

Joongmyeon Bae

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,
Guseong-Dong 373-1, Yuseong-Gu,
Daejeon 305-701, South Korea
e-mail: jmbae@kaist.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 15, 2015; final manuscript received September 15, 2015; published online November 3, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Dr Masashi Mori.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 12(5), 051006 (Nov 03, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: FC-15-1040; doi: 10.1115/1.4031784 History: Received June 15, 2015; Revised September 15, 2015

Hydrogen is a resource that provides energy and forms water only after reacting with oxygen. Among the many hydrogen generation systems, solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) have attracted considerable attention as advanced water electrolysis systems because of their high energy conversion efficiency and low use of electrical energy. To find the relationship between operating conditions and the performance of SOECs, research has been conducted both experimentally, using actual SOECs, and numerically, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this investigation, we developed a 3D simulation model to analyze the relationship between the operating conditions and the overall behavior of SOECs due to different contributions to the overpotential. Simulations were performed with various inlet gas compositions of cathode and anode, cathode thickness, and electrode porosity to identify the main parameters related to performance.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Three-dimensional geometry for simulation

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Fig. 2

Validation of SOEC simulation by comparing I–V curves of simulation data with experimental data of Ebbesen et al. [16]

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Fig. 3

I–V curves with various cathode inlet gas compositions (H2O:H2 = 1:9–9:1)

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Fig. 4

Cathode activation overpotentials with various cathode inlet gas compositions (H2O:H2 = 1:9–9:1) (operating condition: 850 °C)

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Fig. 5

H2O mole fraction profiles in the cathode with various cathode inlet gas compositions (H2O:H2 = 1:9–9:1) (operating condition: 850 °C and V = 1.5 V)

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Fig. 6

Concentration overpotentials with various cathode inlet gas compositions: (a) H2O:H2 = 1:9–5:5 and (b) H2O:H2 = 5:5–9:1

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Fig. 7

(a) Ohmic and (b) anode activation overpotentials with various cathode inlet gas compositions (H2O:H2 = 1:9–9:1)

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Fig. 8

Anode activation overpotentials with various anode inlet gas compositions (N2:O2 = 0:1, 0.79:0.21, 1:0)

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Fig. 9

I–V curves with various cathode thicknesses (300, 500, and 700 μm)

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Fig. 10

I–V curves with various porosities (0.2, 0.3, and 0.4)

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