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Research Papers

Interface Reactions Between Sealing Glass and Metal Interconnect Under Static and Dynamic Heat Treatment Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Lian Peng, Zhaohui Xie

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase
Complex Systems,
Institute of Process Engineering,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China

Qingshan Zhu

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase
Complex Systems,
Institute of Process Engineering,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Zhong Guan Cun, P.O. Box 353,
Haidian District,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: qszhu@ipe.ac.cn

Ping Wang

Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center,
MEP (Ministry of Environmental Protection),
Beijing 100082, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 4, 2015; final manuscript received December 13, 2015; published online January 20, 2016. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Fuel Cell Sci. Technol 12(6), 061009 (Jan 20, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: FC-15-1069; doi: 10.1115/1.4032337 History: Received September 04, 2015; Revised December 13, 2015

Chemical compatibility of sealing glass with metal interconnects is a critical issue for planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this paper, interface reactions between a sealing glass and a ferritic metal interconnect (SS410) are tested under three different heat treatment conditions: sealing (static), aging (static), and thermal cycling (dynamic). The results show that the BaCrO4 crystals with two different morphology (round-shaped and needle-shaped) form both at the three-phase boundary (where air, glass, and SS410 meet) and on the surface of the sealing glass under the three conditions. Round-shaped BaCrO4 crystals form with low O2 concentration and short reaction time. Needle-shaped BaCrO4 crystals form with high O2 concentration and long reaction time. For the thermal cycling condition, the BaCrO4 formed at early stages causes the delamination of the sealing interface. Then, O2 diffuses into the interior interface along the delamination path, which results in the formation of BaCrO4 at the interior interface. The delamination-enhanced BaCrO4 formation during thermal cycling will lead to crack along the sealing interface, causing the striking increase of leak rates.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Scheme of the three heat treatments

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Fig. 2

(a) The SEM image of the investigated areas of the first couple. (b) The low-magnification SEM image of area 1. (c) The high-magnification SEM image of the marked area in (b). (d) The high-magnification SEM image of area 2. (e) The EDX dot analysis for the round-shaped BaCrO4 crystals in (d).

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Fig. 3

(a) The low-magnification SEM image of the three-phase boundary of the second couple. (b) The high-magnification SEM image of the marked area in (a). (c) The SEM image of the interface near the three-phase boundary of the second couple. (d) The SEM image of the interface far away from the three-phase boundary of the second couple. (e) The SEM image of the surface of the second couple. (f) The EDX dot analysis for the needle-shaped BaCrO4 crystals in (e).

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Fig. 4

(a) The SEM image of the three-phase boundary of the third couple. (b) The high-magnification SEM image of the marked area in (a). (c) The low-magnification SEM image of the interior area near the three-phase boundary of the third couple. (d) The high-magnification SEM image of the marked area in (c).

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Fig. 5

The EDX line analysis of the marked area in Fig. 4(d)

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Fig. 6

The schematic illustration of the interfacial degradation mechanism

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