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Technical Brief

An Integrated Bio-Anode Using Yeast Extract for a High-Temperature Glucose Fuel Cell

[+] Author and Article Information
Koichi Kasahara

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering,
Gunma University,
1-5-1, Tenjincho,
Kiryu 376-8515, Gunma, Japan
e-mail: t12801406@gunma-u.ac.jp

Hirokazu Ishitobi

Division of Environmental Engineering Science,
Gunma University,
1-5-1, Tenjincho,
Kiryu 376-8515, Gunma, Japan
e-mail: ishitobi@gunma-u.ac.jp

Shota Yamamori

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering,
Gunma University,
1-5-1, Tenjincho,
Kiryu 376-8515, Gunma, Japan
e-mail: t15803052@gunma-u.ac.jp

Nobuyoshi Nakagawa

Division of Environmental Engineering Science,
Gunma University,
1-5-1, Tenjincho,
Kiryu 376-8515, Gunma, Japan
e-mail: nob.nakagawa@gunma-u.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received February 22, 2016; final manuscript received June 16, 2016; published online July 19, 2016. Assoc. Editor: San Ping Jiang.

J. Electrochem. En. Conv. Stor. 13(1), 014501 (Jul 19, 2016) (4 pages) Paper No: JEECS-16-1029; doi: 10.1115/1.4033970 History: Received February 22, 2016; Revised June 16, 2016

By modifying the carbon electrode with a yeast extract (YE) using a support material (SM), a complete bio-anode was established without adding any extrinsic enzymes and mediators in a glucose–air fuel cell. The yeast extract was mixed into a paste with carbon black and an SM, i.e., glutaraldehyde (GA), TritonX-100, polyethyleneglycol, chitosan, or agarose. Chitosan was the best support, producing lower overpotentials and a good stability. Optimization of the paste composition and its loading were carried out for the bio-anode of a glucose–air fuel cell. The fuel cell generated a power of 33 μW cm−2 at 333 K with an aqueous glucose solution without adding any extrinsic enzymes and mediators. It showed about 70% of the initial power output at a stable condition. The bio-anode is expected to be used for energy recovery from hot wastewater-containing glucose.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Effect of the loading of the YE mixture on the anode performance of the glucose electrode at 308 K (mixture: CB:YE:chitosan = 1:2:1.5; and anode solution: 20 g l−1 glucose and 50 mM phosphate buffer)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Effect of chitosan content in the mixture for the YE-modified electrode on the anode performance at 308 K (CB and YE loadings were 4.4 mg cm−2 and 8.8 mg cm−2, respectively; and anode solution: 20 g l−1 glucose and 50 mM phosphate buffer)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Anode performance of the YE-modified electrode with different SMs at 308 K (mixture: CB:YE:SM = 1:2:2; CB loading: 4.4 mg cm−2; and anode solution: 20 g l−1 glucose and 50 mM phosphate buffer)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Power generation performance of the glucose–air fuel cell with the YE-modified bio-anode: (a) electrode potentials and (b) cell voltage and power density (anode solution: 20 g l−1 glucose and 50 mM phosphate buffer)

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