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Research Papers

Performance of a Thermally Coupled Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell System Under Different Operation Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Gustavo A. Andreasen

Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas
Teóricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA),
Facultad de Ciencias Exactas,
Universidad Nacional de La
Plata (UNLP)-Consejo Nacional
de Investigaciones Científicas
y Técnicas (CONICET),
Diagonal 113 y 64, CC. 16, Suc. 4,
La Plata 1900, Argentina
e-mail: gandreasen@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

Silvina G. Ramos

Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas
Teóricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA),
Facultad de Ciencias Exactas,
Universidad Nacional de La
Plata (UNLP)-Consejo Nacional
de Investigaciones Científicas
y Técnicas (CONICET),
Diagonal 113 y 64, CC. 16, Suc. 4,
La Plata 1900, Argentina
e-mail: sramos@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

Hernán A. Peretti

Centro Atómico Bariloche-Comisión
Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA),
Av. E. Bustillo 9500,
San Carlos de Bariloche,
Río Negro 8400, Argentina
e-mail: hernan.americo.peretti@gmail.com

Walter E. Triaca

Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas
Teóricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA),
Facultad de Ciencias Exactas,
Universidad Nacional de La
Plata (UNLP)-Consejo Nacional
de Investigaciones Científicas
y Técnicas (CONICET),
Diagonal 113 y 64, CC. 16, Suc. 4,
La Plata 1900, Argentina
e-mail: walter.triaca@speedy.com.ar

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 1, 2016; final manuscript received October 26, 2016; published online November 16, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Robert J. Braun.

J. Electrochem. En. Conv. Stor. 13(2), 021005 (Nov 16, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JEECS-16-1044; doi: 10.1115/1.4035100 History: Received April 01, 2016; Revised October 26, 2016

The performance of a hydrogen storage prototype loaded with AB5H6 hydride, whose equilibrium pressure makes it suitable for both feeding a H2/air proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell and being charged directly from a low-pressure water electrolyzer, interacting thermally with the fuel cell exhaust air, is reported. The nominal 70 L hydrogen storage capacity of the prototype suffices for hydrogen delivery at 0.5 L min−1, which allows a power supply of 50 W for 140 min from the H2/air fuel cell in the absence of thermal interaction. The storage prototype was characterized by monitoring the internal pressure and the temperatures of the external wall and at the center inside the container at different hydrogen discharge conditions. The responses of the integrated system after either immersing the metal hydride container in air or exposing it to the fuel cell hot exhaust air stream under forced convection were compared. The system shows the best performance when the heat generated at the fuel cell is used to increase the metal hydride container temperature, allowing the operation of the fuel cell at 280 W for 16 min at a high hydrogen flow rate of 4 L min−1.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

P–C isotherms for MmNi4.7Al0.3 alloy

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Fig. 2

Metal hydride container

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Fig. 3

Scheme of the metal hydride bed. Te = container external wall temperature. Ti = hydride bed temperature.

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Fig. 4

Fuel cell stack assembly

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Fig. 6

Fuel cell temperature (Tc), external wall temperature (Te), internal temperature (Ti), and hydrogen pressure (P) in the hydride container as a function of time for JH2  = 0.5 L min−1: (a) WTI condition and (b) TI condition

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Fig. 7

Fuel cell temperature (Tc), external wall temperature (Te), internal temperature (Ti), and hydrogen pressure (P) in the hydride container as a function of time for JH2  = 2 L min−1: (a) WTI condition and (b) TI condition

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Fig. 8

Fuel cell temperature (Tc), external wall temperature (Te), internal temperature (Ti), and hydrogen pressure (P) in the hydride container as a function of time for JH2  = 4 L min−1: (a) WTI condition and (b) TI condition

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Fig. 9

Dehydriding process heat (Qd) and heat generated at the fuel cell (Qfc) per unit time versus hydrogen flow rate (JH2)

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Fig. 10

Hydrogen pressure (P) as a function of released hydrogen mass at different discharge flow rates

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Fig. 11

Recovery efficiency of the hydrogen stored in the container as a function of hydrogen flow rate (JH2) for TI and WTI conditions

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