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Research Papers

Nonprismatic Air-Breathing Fuel Cells—Concept, Theory, Design, and Manufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Sriram Praneeth Isanaka

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
400 W 13th Street,
Rolla, MO 65401
e-mail: sihyd@mst.edu

Frank F. Liou

Bytnar Professor
Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
400 W 13th Street,
Rolla, MO 65401
e-mail: liou@mst.edu

Joseph W. Newkirk

Professor
Department of Materials Science,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
1201 N State Street,
Rolla, MO 65409
e-mail: jnewkirk@mst.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 8, 2015; final manuscript received October 28, 2016; published online November 22, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Umberto Desideri.

J. Electrochem. En. Conv. Stor. 13(2), 021006 (Nov 22, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: JEECS-15-1018; doi: 10.1115/1.4035104 History: Received December 08, 2015; Revised October 28, 2016

This paper details the research into axis symmetric architecture (ASA) proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells possessing nonprismatic cylindrical architecture. Advantages of the ASA include improved fuel flow, reduced sealing area and weight, and increased power densities. Numerical and analytical studies will show improvements to flow characteristics. The ASA design facilitates natural convective flow to promote improved reactant availability and the prototypes created also show the ease of manufacture and assembly. ASA designs, unlike traditional fuel cells, do not require clamping plates and fastening mechanisms and lead to prototypes with reduced size, weight, and cost.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

CAD model section of the ASA

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Fig. 2

Comparison of fluid dynamics in serpentine flow channels between conventional prismatic and nonprismatic ASA designs (a) serpentine flow sections with multiple 90 deg elbow bends and (b) helical flow sections with multiple 90 deg elbow bends

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Fig. 3

Comparison of fluid dynamics in straight flow channels between conventional prismatic and nonprismatic ASA designs (a) conventional, planar design with straight flow channels and (b) ASA with straight flow channels and multiple inlets and outlets

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Fig. 4

Velocity diagram indicating the occurrence of the natural convective flow

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Fig. 5

Mass fraction in straight channel flow field on conventional flat plate design (single point fuel entry and exit, indicating stagnant zones)

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Fig. 6

Internal view of manifold design in ASA (multipoint entry and exit of fuel with limited manufacturing complexity)

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Fig. 7

Mass fractions of air being displaced by hydrogen in a straight channel ASA at times (a) 0.19 s, (b) 0.35 s, and (c) 0.63 s, respectively

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Fig. 8

Mass fractions of air being displaced by hydrogen in a pin channel ASA at times (a) 0.36 s, (b) 0.66 s, and (c) 1.04 s, respectively

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Fig. 9

CAD representation of cross sections in straight channel designs

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Fig. 10

Assembly drawing of flat plate design

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Fig. 11

Assembly drawing of ASA

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