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Research Papers

Thermal Cycle Stability of Sealing Glass for 8YSZ Coated Cr-Containing Metal Interconnect

[+] Author and Article Information
Lian Peng, Yang Bai

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase
Complex Systems,
Institute of Process Engineering,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China

Qingshan Zhu

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase
Complex Systems,
Institute of Process Engineering,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Zhong Guan Cun, Haidian District,
P.O. Box 353,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: qszhu@home.ipe.ac.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received November 6, 2016; final manuscript received December 16, 2016; published online January 24, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Kevin Huang.

J. Electrochem. En. Conv. Stor. 13(4), 041002 (Jan 24, 2017) (7 pages) Paper No: JEECS-16-1150; doi: 10.1115/1.4035624 History: Received November 06, 2016; Revised December 16, 2016

An 8 mol. % yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) coating has been prepared on a Cr-containing stainless steel interconnect (SS410) to improve the chemical compatibility of a BaO–B2O3–SiO2 sealing glass with the SS410. Three different methods as, grinding the 8YSZ coating prior to the sealing (fixture A), putting an interlayer glass on the 8YSZ coating prior to the sealing (fixture B), and exerting an external compressive force of ∼10.28 kPa during the sealing (fixture C), have been used to improve the thermal cycle stability of the sealing glass. The fixture A (using the grinding method) and the fixture B (using the interlayer method) both show poor thermal cycle stability. For the fixture C, the external compressive force is found to help the self-healing of the sealing glass. Due to the good chemical compatibility of the sealing glass with the 8YSZ coating, the sealing glass of the fixture C exhibits super long-term thermal cycle stability. The leak rates of the sealing glass of the fixture C show nearly no increase up to 280 thermal cycles, after which the leak rates increase slowly with the thermal cycles and the leak rate is still less than the Solid Energy Convergence Alliance (SECA) limit at the 626th thermal cycle.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Typical thermal expansion curves of the interlayer glass and sealing glass

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Fig. 2

Optical micrographs of the three different fixtures after the thermal cycle tests: (a) the fixture A, (b) the fixture B, and (c) the fixture C

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Fig. 3

Low magnification SEM images of the cross section of (a) the fixture A, (b) the fixture B, and (c) the fixture C

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Fig. 4

The dependence of the leak rates of the three fixtures on thermal cycles

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Fig. 5

The SEM images of the 8YSZ coating cross section: (a) after grinding and (b) before grinding

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Fig. 6

A SEM image of the sealing glass/8YSZ coating interface of the fixture A

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Fig. 7

SEM images of the cross section of the fixture B: (a) a low magnification, (b) a high magnification of the left portion of the marked area in (a), and (c) a high magnification of the right portion of the marked area in (a)

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Fig. 8

SEM images of the cross section of the fixture C: (a) a low magnification and (b) a high magnification

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Fig. 9

The long-term thermal cycle stability of the sealing glass for the fixture C

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